Not many know what erectile dysfunction really is, new data from a recent European survey show
Erectile dysfunction

Not many know what erectile dysfunction really is, new data from a recent European survey show

Erectile dysfunction is a quite common disorder, and yet it is not well known. Many have never even heard of it, a third of those who think they know what it is will define it incorrectly and those who have experienced it first-hand usually don’t talk to their partners about it. In short, the image presented by the commissioned survey of the European Association of Urology (EAU) and released on September 2020, leaves us with a disheartening panorama. Interviews were conducted on a sample of 3032 men and women between the ages of 20 and 70 living in Spain, France, Germany, and the United Kingdom.

The overall lack of knowledge about this topic is clearly revealed by the data. 34% of those interviewed gave an incorrect response when they were asked to define erectile dysfunction while 17% of people replied that they had never heard of it. These numbers were higher when looking only at those who were single and at German citizens, who had the lowest grades among the various groups (only 49% responded correctly against the Spanish 78%). “Erectile dysfunction is a common medical condition, and it is surprising that most people are unaware of its definition”, commented Christopher Chapple, general secretary of the EAU. Epidemiological data show that the global prevalence of erectile dysfunction is around 52% for men between 40 and 70.

“The risk grows with age but we know that no man, regardless of age or ethnicity, is completely immune. There should not be this taboo surrounding the discussion and even if the majority of people did confirm having spoken with others about it, there is still a lot of work to be done to better things”, added Chapple. Of the 17% who said that had experienced erectile dysfunction, 26% admitted to have told no one about it. Only 53% sought out medical advice.

The younger men often turned to couples therapy and psychologists, when the others often opted for urologists and sexologists. 25% of those interviewed were unaware that there exist both behavioural and drug therapies that can aid in the treatment of this disorder.

HFTHQ 20-43

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